Tag Archive: Edward Thomas

Eleanor Farjeon

Eleanor Farjeon

Eleanor Farjeon was born in London on 13th February 1881, the third child of writer Benjamin Farjeon and his wife Margaret (Maggie) Jefferson, who was the daughter of the American actor Joseph Jefferson. Just a few months after Eleanor’s birth, in the summer of 1881, her older brother Charles died, aged just one. Eleanor, known […]

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Wilfrid Wilson Gibson

Wilfred Wilson Gibson

Wilfrid Wilson Gibson was born on 2nd October 1878 at Hexham in Northumberland, one of the nine children of John Pattison Gibson and his wife Elizabeth Judith (née Walton). Wilfrid Gibson’s father was a pharmacist by profession, but was also a part-time writer and historian and while his upbringing was by no means affluent, it […]

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Literary Connections No.5: Edward Thomas

Literary Connections No.5

Literary Connections No.5, shows the links between Edward Thomas, Ivor Gurney, Edmund Blunden, Siegfried Sassoon, and Rupert Brooke.

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Steep War Memorial

War Memorial, Steep

The memorial at Steep is quiet and unobtrusive, set back from the road on a quiet turning. It consists of a stone built, roofed tower structure with a simple engraved plaque, containing the names of 54 men of Steep, including the poet Edward Thomas, who gave their lives during the First World War. Of these […]

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A visit to… Steep

View from Shoulder of Mutton Hill, Steep

Taking the Edward Thomas walk in the area immediately surrounding the village of Steep, near Petersfield in Hampshire, it is quite easy to see why the poet fell in love with this corner of England. He was renowned for temporarily absconding from the family home, in order to soak up the atmosphere in the countryside. […]

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The Red Sweet Wine of Youth – The Brave and Brief Lives of the War Poets

The Red Sweet Wine of Youth by Nicholas Murray cover

A group portrait of the poets of the First World War by Nicholas Murray Published by: Little, Brown Cover Price: £25.00 All references given below refer to the hardback edition. Before reviewing this book, I thought I would read the opinions of others and, upon doing so, discovered it had been almost universally praised as […]

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